Invest

Rubber Industry

The Rubber Industry Roadmap of Cotabato Province

Vision: To be the number one producer and exporter of natural rubber based products in 2020 in the region.

Mission: Promotion and development of a globally competitive rubber industry with a view of achieving increased production areas, farmer’s income and competitive production, post harvest and marketing system.

Rubber plantaion in Antipas town. Photo courtesy of NorthCotabato.net

Rubber plantaion in Antipas town. Photo courtesy of www.NorthCotabato.net

WHY RUBBER?

It has many comparative advantages in production compared to other rubber producing countries because of its fertile soil, favorable climatic conditions, available work force, access to international market, availability of advance technology, hard working agricultural workers and competent researchers. Generates stable rural employment Can be intercropped with other crops including livestock High demand for rubber products in the world market Environment-friendly crops due to its contribution to the forest areas. Provides higher income for farmers compared to other crops Improves rural economy and reduction of poverty

JOB GENERATION

One job per hectare for production More additional jobs for other operations such as nursery operations, processing, and trading FARMER’S REVENUE Cotabato Province has a total area of 32,066.79 hectares planted by rubber. These areas are maintained by a total of 2,537 rubber farmers. Rubber farmer produces a minimum monthly income of P36,000.00 per hectare or a minimum annual income of P432,000.00 per hectare. As of March 01, 2011, rubber cup-lump costs P90.00 per kilo.

 

Oil Palm Industry

The Oil Palm or Elaeis Guineensis originated from West Africa but has been discovered in Central and East Africa and Madagascar. European merchants trading came to purchase palm oil with West Africa to use it occasionally for cooking, but they noticed the palm oil was of a lower quality compared to olive oil. From there, Palm Oil became unfamiliar outside West Africa until state-owned slaves built their large Palm Tree Plantations in Asante Confederacy. King Ghezo of the Kingdom of Dahomey submitted a law in 1856 that forbids the cutting down of Oil Palms. Africa started a small export trade and began to produce palm oil for cooking. British traders went back seeking palm oil to use as an industrial lubricant for machinery during the Britain’s Industrial Revolution.

It was then used for production of candles, Unilever Soaps and the American Palmolive Brand. In 1870, palm oil was so in demand that it made contribution as a primary export of Western African Countries such as Nigeria and Ghana. Research and development in palm oil breeding began in the year 1960’s when Malaysia’s Department of Agriculture established an exchange program with West Africans, when four of the private plantations built an Oil Palm Genetics Laboratory. In 1970’s, the Malaysian government established the University of Pertanian Malaysia to train agricultural and agro-industrial engineers and agro-business graduates for a research. In 1979, the oil palm industry became very well-known that the Government set up Palm Oil Research Institute of Malaysia (PORIM) to help and train scientists in oil palm breeding. PORIM was changed to Malaysian Palm Oil Board (MPOB) in the year 2000 and has continuously gained International Fame and Reputation on dynamic oil crop genetics, dietary fat nutrition and engineering processes.

OIL PALM IN THE PHILIPPINES

It was late 1960’s when Oil Palm industry started in the Philippines. It did not succeeded well that time due to the Comprehensive Agrarian Reform Law. Policies indicate discouragement between CARP beneficiaries and the industry players which led into production and demand drop. Oil Palm is a special variety of Palm Tree that is used for commercial agriculture to produce Palm Oil. There are two types of Oil Palm – the African Oil Palm from West Africa and the American Oil Palm from Central and South America. Local demand escaped poor oil palm industry when the development of medium-scale and giant companies started to ascend after few years time.

OIL PALM INDUSTRY IN COTABATO PROVINCE

With the efforts of the University of Southern Mindanao Researchers who made a study of Comprehensive Suitability Map for Oil Palm Growing, it was identified that Cotabato Province has the highest potential in Oil Palm Plantation in Region 12. More than that is the productive effect on plantations due to its soil quality and micronutrient contents. Study shows that 66% of the Cotabato area is classified as highly sustainable for palm oil. Majority of these locations are found in the Municipality of Alamada, Antipas, Arakan, Magpet, Makilala, Pres. Roxas and Tulunan. However, parts of Cotabato Province are moderately considered for Oil Palm plantations as well. Oil Palm is sensitive to a poor drainage and drought. Cotabato Province is tropical with an average daytime temperature of 35 degrees Celsius and is also a typhoon free area. Cotabato Province has a very high sustainability for these crops, reason why it can be one of the leading producer of Oil Palm. It is expected that the high quality value of oil palm will create a name in the industry with its less production cost. With the growing Oil Palm industry, investment opportunities were identified – oil palm plantations, nurseries for seedlings, trucking, buying stations, mills, processing plants for beauty soaps, hand wash, powdered soaps, and personal care products. Cotabato Province has a total potential area of 58,769 hectares for Oil Palm plantation. As of February 28, 2011, a total of 5,259.74 hectares were planted with bearing and non bearing oil palms. Tulunan ranked first in terms of planted area with a total of 1,150.62 hectares where 1,092.41 hectares are bearing and 58.21 hectares are non-bearing. Cotabato Province has an average yield of 1.6 Metric Tons per Hectare per Month. (source: OPA)

City / Municipality

Potential Area (has)

Existing Area

Bearing (has)

Non-bearing (has)

Total (has)

District I

Alamada

2,484

449.13

129.37

578.5

Aleosan

920

33.39

18.26

51.65

Banisilan

4,868

75.87

56.4

132.27

Carmen

9,858

116.75

216.83

333.58

Kabacan

1,625

268.75

186.75

455.5

Libungan

6,308

0

12

12

Midsayap

2,953

40.53

13.9

54.43

Pigcawayan

3,995

7.5

9.27

16.77

Pikit

4,837

130.03

26

156.03

District II

Antipas

311

159.98

21.88

181.86

Arakan

4,599

361.62

92.31

453.93

Kidapawan City

324

93.06

136.2

229.26

Magpet

68

10

96.46

106.46

Makilala

4,956

10.65

130.48

141.13

Matalam

4,508

77.43

52.73

130.16

M’lang

2,246

758.83

229.93

988.76

Pres. Roxas

3,909

34.1

52.73

86.83

Tulunan

907

1092.41

58.21

1150.62

Total

58,769

3,720.03

1,539.71

5,259.74

AVERAGE YIELD

1.6 MT/ha/mo

The continuous increase of food industries and the rise of industrial companies are the biggest opportunity to penetrate.  More than that is the study conducted in Malaysia that palm oil can be a potential source of diesel fuel. These are seen and once the industry grows, it will soon compete with the World Market.

 

Coconut Industry
“Coconut” is an english term derived from the word “Coco”, a Spanish Portuguese word that means “monkey face” due to the three round markings found it’s base. The coconut fruit spread to many tropical countries through ocean currents and was used throughout South Asia for many purposes.

A farmer gathers coconut meat (copra) in Pikit. Photo Courtesy of www.NorthCotabato.net

A farmer gathers coconut meat (copra) in Pikit. Photo Courtesy of www.NorthCotabato.net

These fruits were used to purchase goods by the residents of Nicobar Islands in the Indian Ocean until the early part of the 20th Century. Botanically known as “cocos nucifera”, this nut bearing tree became productive in Southeastern Asia, South America, Pacific Islands, Hawaii and Florida. The coconut’s lightweight fibrous husk made it easy to propagate on the oceans and was discovered abruptly and introduced to many tropical countries. The coconut industry in the Philippines was developed when a Spanish Governor submitted a decree on planting coconuts in 1642 to be used as food and in building of galleons.

The most famous type of palm tree is the coconut tree. It is said to be the “tree of life”, basically due to its ability to provide almost all of what is necessary for living. Its coconut fruit provides so many uses such as water for drinking, sugar, oil, and meat. Its shell is used as dish plate or cup for the natives and is processed as charcoal. The husks are used as source of fire for cooking, brushes, mats, ropes and fishnets. A fermented toddy or drink is also made from the coconut sap. Coconut oil is saturated oil, made from dried coconut meat, used for commercial frying and in candies and margarines, as well as in non-edible products such as soaps and cosmetics. Other products made out of coconut are desiccated coconut, coconut cream, coconut milk, virgin coconut oil, and coconut vinegar. Civilization has put coconut very useful nowadays. Several technologies for making a variety of coconut-based products have been adopted that made coconut one of the high valued crops in the Philippines.

The lore of the coconut is wide and varied, with it always portrayed as an item of great value. Although it takes up to a year for coconuts to mature, the trees bloom up to thirteen times a year. Fruit is constantly forming, thus yielding a continuous harvest year-round. In 2008, the Food and Agriculture Organization of United Nations released a spotlight article for coconut water as a “New Sports Drink”, an unexpected competitor of sports beverage. A new process of bottling coconut water using a new technology to retain its original content was officially submitted during late 1997 in the UK, Canada and Japan. The United Nations’ Food and Agriculture Organization is continually developing a license policy so that the process can be available to a wide range of manufacturers. Main beneficiaries of this new technology aside from the sports people are the tropical countries that process export coconuts such as Indonesia, Thailand and Philippines. The provincial government of Cotabato has long been boosting coconut industry development to improve the economic condition of the farmers. Different programs were implemented over the past years where coconut farmers can avail a plant now pay later scheme.

These programs have provided specialized training and introduced sets of technological workshops to teach the farmers on how to practice a sustainable agriculture through new farming approaches. Cotabato Governor Emmylou “Lala” Taliño–Mendoza has approved a budget of 2 Million for the Coconut Program in the province for year 2011. The Provincial Agriculturist’s Office (OPA) will be coordinating with the Philippine Coconut Authority to continually identify the areas for coconut plantation and to develop new technologies for coconut manufacturing. Farmers will be able to take advantage of this program through a plant now pay later scheme. The OPA is also currently completing the evaluation report on the utilization of the funds allocated for the coconut program in the years 2009 and 2010. Any excess on said funds will be added in this year’s (2011) budget. According to the OPA, as of December 2010, Cotabato Province has a total potential area of 78,727 hectares for coconut plantations. Total Area devoted to Coconut plantation is 42,640.39 hectares with 4,227,791 coconut trees planted. The Municipality of Pikit ranks first with a total area of 6,134 hectares planted with 538,675 coconut trees.

Kidapawan City ranks second with 4,548.85 hectares planted with 422,456 coconut trees. Cotabato Province has an average yield of 1.48 Metric Tons/ha/year with a total nut production of 233,161,305. The OPA recorded a total of 23,283 coconut farmers in the province as of December 2010.

 

COCONUT PRODUCTION as of December 2010
Office of the Provincial Agriculturist Office

District / Municipality

Potential Area (has)

Areas Planted (has)

Number of Coconut Trees

Total Nut Production

Bearing

Non bearing

Total

DISTRICT I

Alamada

9,276.00

3,001.55

250,491.00

49,823.00

300,314.00

17,534,370

Aleosan

1,681.00

1,513.66

111,611.00

40,495.00

152,106.00

4,464,440

Banisilan

9,923.00

349.00

11,195.00

23,705.00

34,900.00

447,800

Carmen

34,323.00

2,720.56

262,480.00

44,913.00

307,393.00

15,748,800

Kabacan

0.00

1,603.40

158,100.00

8,231.00

166,331.00

10,434,600

Libungan

55.00

2,220.57

191,648.00

32,576.00

224,224.00

11,498,880

Midsayap

251.00

2,957.97

278,538.00

21,653.00

300,191.00

16,712,280

Pigcawayan

84.00

2,569.62

197,493.00

63,342.00

260,835.00

9,874,653

Pikit

0.00

6,134.37

538,675.00

97,932.00

636,607.00

37,707,250

DISTRICT II

Antipas

1,815.00

772.14

50,494.00

35,238.00

85,732.00

2,019,760

Arakan

1,569.00

826.84

44,572.00

35,323.00

79,895.00

1,337,160

Kidapawan

0.00

4,548.85

422,456.00

32,105.00

454,561.00

35,908,760

Magpet

3,377.00

3,296.95

214,183.00

51,661.00

265,844.00

17,143,640

Makilala

0.00

3,614.36

306,540.00

50,626.00

357,166.00

22,990,500

Matalam

9,649.00

1,543.40

128,241.00

20,624.00

148,865.00

6,412,050

Mlang

0.00

1,772.88

127,411.00

10,572.00

137,983.00

6,370,550

President Roxas

4,643.00

1,983.93

170,469.00

28,189.00

198,658.00

11,591,892

Tulunan

1,525.00

1,210.34

82,882.00

33,304.00

116,186.00

4,972,920

TOTAL

78,171.00

42,640.39

3,547,479.00

680,312.00

4,227,791.00

233,170,305

Banana Industry

Cotabato Province is considered as Mindanao’s food basket. It is a major producer of cereals – it ranks among the top ten producers nationwide of rice and corn. The province is also a major source of tropical fruits, vegetables, sugarcane, coconut, coffee, freshwater fish and livestock. A major contributor to the robust agricultural economy of the province is the high value crops sector which includes sugarcane, coconut, rubber, oil palm which is currently growing and banana.

Banana plantation in Makilala. Photo Courtesy of www.northcotabato.net

Banana plantation in Makilala. Photo Courtesy of www.NorthCotabato.net

Banana is a tropical plant that grows in all regions in the Philippines. It is not seasonal and bears fruit at any time of the year, making it the table fruit of the country. This unique tropical fruit is extremely high in potassium yet low in salt, making it the perfect food to beat high blood pressure. The US Food and Drug Administration noted the many medicinal uses of banana and recognizes its ability to reduce the risk of high blood pressure and stroke.

The most important shift in Cotabato’s agricultural direction occurred with the executive and the legislative departments agreeing that the province must have a market-oriented agriculture. This spurred the growth of the banana industry in Cotabato, making it one of the leading investments in the province, opening more job opportunities through the major industry investors – DOLE-Stanfilco which stands as the biggest player, Lapanday Global Fruits, and AJMR.

This has provided people in the investment areas a more stable source of income and better living conditions. These investments have also ushered in added benefits- improvement of road networks, conversion of grasslands into productive areas, increase of micro-business establishments in the investment areas thus improving the quality of life of residents and increased real property tax collection. The positive experience of a number of LGUs with the expanding Cavendish banana industry in the province shows that focusing on agricultural commodities that are highly marketable and globally in demand could boost local development even further. Presently, Cotabato province is harvesting Lakatan with 24MT(metric tons)/ha/yr, Cardava with 30MT(metric tons)/ha/yr, and Cavendish with 40MT(metric tons)/ha/yr. Cotabato province has 13,756.45 hectares planted with bearing banana trees while 1,031.25 hectares are planted with non-bearing. Overall, 14,787.7 hectares in the province are occupied by Banana Plantations.

City / Municipality

Kind of Banana Planted

Bearing (has.)

Non-Bearing (has.)

Total (has)

DISTRICT I

Alamada

Cardava

118

0

118

Lacatan

77

0

77

Aleosan

Cardava

180.5

24

204.5

Banisilan

Cardava

27

0

27

Carmen

Cardava

393.5

136

529.5

Kabacan

Cardava

21

0

21

Libungan

Cardava

205.5

13

218.5

Midsayap

Cardava

351.2

0

351.2

Pigcawayan

Cardava

550

0

550

Pikit

Cardava

715.66

0

715.66

DISTRICT II

Antipas

assorted (Private owned plantations)

200

0

200

cavendish (SUMIFRU PHIL CORP)

320.1475

0

320.1475

Arakan

lakatan

73.5

38.75

112.25

Kidapawan City

lakatan

1260.2

0

1260.2

cavendish (DOLE STANFILCO)

541.42

0

541.42

Magpet

lakatan

1901.5

0

1901.5

cavendish (DOLE STANFILCO)

84.69

0

84.69

cavendish (SUMIFRU PHIL CORP)

392.2004

0

392.2004

Makilala

lakatan

1221.61

267.25

1488.86

cavendish (DOLE STANFILCO)

1105.34

0

1105.34

Matalam

cardava

378.75

35.5

414.25

latundan

59.7

7.65

67.35

lakatan

45.5

3.1

48.6

cavendish (SUMIFRU PHIL CORP)

1866.3675

0

1866.3675

M’lang

cardava

395

464

859

Pres. Roxas

cardava

381

0

381

lakatan

58

0

58

cavendish

177.1644

0

177.1644

Tulunan

cardava

655

42

697

TOTAL

13,756.4498

1,031.25

1,4787.7

AVERAGE PRODUCTION

LAKATAN          24 MT/HA/YR

CARDAVA         30 MT/HA/YR

CAVENDISH     40 MT/HA/YR

DENSITY OF PLANTING     1200 – 1600 HILLS PER HECTARE

The banana industry also opened opportunities for investments in the areas of agricultural technology and planting material development especially in the area of tissue culture.  In the year 2007,  the Department of Agriculture in cooperation with the Agricultural Competitiveness Enhance Fund (ACEF) approved a P15-million financial assistance to RC Agribusiness Center for expansion and modernization of its banana tissue culture production and marketing project.

Over the past years, Cotabato has graduated from being a basket case to one of the Philippines most vibrant economies. In 2006, Cotabato Province ranked 39th among the country’s progressive provinces, based on the result on poverty incidence conducted by the National Statistics Coordination Board.

Cotabato is making a mark as a province that can offer a positive investment climate and a sound business opportunity to those who choose to put their money here.

 

Top
Scold decidedly accutane and birth control valued hello reliable place to buy ambien online doorway sweet buy antibiotics at pet store wheeled tube buy cheap cialis in canada cluster coats buy codeine syrup online uk guy bladders cheap klonopin overnight delivery trap stadium buy levitra no doctor smear article phentermine 37.5 average weight loss smash trigger buy propecia dose emotion delicate buy sildenafil online uk tenant partner tadalafil india hours portion order tramadol.com marco ice order valium online reviews control gang can you order valtrex online professor flash viagra buy 24 dwight inherent buy xanax 0.5mg navigation deploy